Double Agent. Tom Bradby

A follow up book to Secret Agent, released this time last year, this book picks up the story of senior MI6 Officer Kate Henderson.

Her husband, who has been identified as a Russian Agent is now living in Moscow, but Kate has managed to take their children to meet him on a trip to Venice. During the trip Kate is kidnapped by a Russian agent who offers her unassailable proof that the U.K. Prime Minister is working for the Russians and that a change of power in the Kremlin is taking place.

To give credence to this he also tells her about a ending revolution in Estonia, which is attempted the next day.

Back in the U.K. Kate takes the information to her boss. He’s keen to exploit the information and give in to the demands of the Russian agent who, in turn wants to defect with his family to England.but others in MI6 aren’t so sure, and neither are the politicians.

The story continues with Kate trying to authenticate the truth about the Kremlin and the evidence on the PM.

At one point in the book Kate’s son jokingly asks her if she’s a female James Bond. She is but the story is so much more than the usual all action espionage thriller. It looks at the effect the job has on Kate, her physical and mental health, and her family. The tension, the lack of sleep, the constant second guessing, not just her own decisions but those of the people around her, takes it out of her.

The story also looks at the complex political and personal relationships formed, and in places abused, in the hallow halls of parliament, and the insular offices of the “MI…” departments of the security services.

I enjoyed nearly all of this book but, and it’s a big but, with only a few pages left I was thinking how is this going to finish. I was reading on a kindle and even checked if I had fully downloaded the book.

The answer was it didn’t.

It did, the story finishes, as in there is an end to the book, but there’s no conclusion. It just feels like the end of another chapter. If it was meant to be a cliffhanger it didn’t work. Even if there is another book in the series I would have liked a less ambiguous ending to this one.

Pages: 368
Publisher: Bantam Press
Publishing date: 28th May 2020

HUNTING GROUND L.J Morris

 

For years my genre of choice was cold war, or espionage books, by authors such as Robert Ludlum, Nelson DeMille and Tom Clancy, but new books like these have been few and far between for years.

At last somebody is filling the gap with quality material.

L.J Morris has written a brilliant post-cold war book that sees the security of the UK, and the stability of world politics at risk.

Stuck in a Mexican Prison ex-special agent Ali Sinclair is frightened for her life and wondering why she has been abandoned to her fate.

Meanwhile her handler, from British Intelligence, is working on her release when an urgent request from another agent, Frank McGill, ramps up the urgency of Sinclair’s release.

Somebody is making an attempt to take over the UK Government from within. A journalist had been on the track of the conspirators but has been murdered. He didn’t give away any information, but he has left a document outlining his findings.

Only his boyfriend can decipher the clues that he left to the documents location.

McGill had been tasked with locating the boyfriend and getting the document, but somebody nearly beats him to it, and McGill and the boyfriend go into hiding.

McGill will only trust Sinclair and so she is sent to meet him.

What follows is a brilliant story of subterfuge and espionage which sees McGill and Sinclair teamed up with a most unexpected ally.

The story moves a break-neck pace but retains its plausibility, which is a writing skill in itself.

What makes the story all the more incredible is, when you look at British Politics over the last couple of decades, the story is very credible.

Had Morris been writing in Clancy, DeMille, and Ludlum’s, era they would have had a worthy contemporary fighting for position at the top of the Best Seller List.

I loved this book.

Pages: 358

Publisher: Crows Foot Books

Available NOW

A Treachery of Spies. Manda Scott

IMG_2476

Two great stories rolled into one. A second world war espionage story that Len Deighton would have been proud of, and a modern crime story worthy of any of the present day authors writing excellent crime fiction.

The murder of an elderly lady in Orleans, France, is a horrible crime at the best of times. The fact that she has been executed and then mutilated, in a very specific manner, makes the crime even more hideous.

Enter Captain Ines Picaut of the French Police, and her small team. Picaut is recently returned to work having been badly burnt in a house fire but us soon into her stride.

The team tentatively identify the woman and link her to a production company making a TV series about a band of French Resistance Fighters during the Second World War.

The investigation will lead them to start to uncovering facts about the dead woman, and the part she played in the Resistance.

Here starts the second story. That of spies, double agents and treachery. The story of a young woman that escapes from occupied Europe and is trained as an agent that can work with the Resistance. She will work behind enemy lines with agents from across Europe and with French citizens trying to free their own country.

Whilst in France she will encounter; French people who sympathise with the Germans and see the retribution that is brought on them by their own Countrymen; she will have to work with people she despises and decide on which of the people she likes will die.

The small band that makes up her group all seem to have the same allegiances, but have they??

Who is on her side, and who feeding the enemy information.

As the two stories unfold, the modern day investigation, and the second world war drama, identities are uncovered. Nobody is who they seem, and somebody is acting as puppet master, pulling all the strings, but to what end.

I have used no names, except for the present day Police Captain’s, in this review. There is a good reason for that. Some of the characters in this book have multiple identities, because they have worked for different countries and different agencies. To use any of the names might be a bit of a spoiler to the story.

And this is an excellent story that I would hate to spoil for anybody.

Amongst most new fiction this is a tomb of a book at nearly 500 pages. Every page is a pleasure to read. The pace of the book is frantic but very enjoyable.

I have loved WW II stories since I was a young teenager, and I may be being nostalgic, but reading this book has made me wish there were more being written today.

Pages: 480

Publisher: Bantam Press, Random House

Publishing Date: 9th August 2018